Mount Hope Cemetery

Learn from the past. Live for today. Plan for the future

Rich in History

Mount Hope Cemetery began in 1880 when Thomas Williams Williamson and other visionaries came together to create what would become Florence's longest operating cemetery. Mount Hope is also the resting place for many community and State leaders, as well as some prominent citizens from South Carolina's colorful history.

Not far from the entrance to the cemetery, an obelisk monument marks the grave site of 64 Confederate soldiers, of which only 3 have been identified. That monument and the soldiers were originally located in the yard of the original site of the First Presbyterian Church on Church Street near the railroad crossing. When the Church moved in 1905, the monument and the soldiers were moved to their permanent resting site at Mount Hope.

The photo above shows the monument and the grave site.

 

A Southern Cross of Honor identifies other Confederate Soldiers who are buried throughout the cemetery. A special ceremony is held at Mount Hope each year on the second Saturday in May to honor those fallen soldiers from another time.

 

Mount Hope is also the resting place for many community and State leaders, as well as some prominent citizens from South Carolina's colorful history. Among them is Melvin Purvis, a Florence attorney and former FBI leader who, with his men, brought to justice the notorious John Dillenger, Public Enemy Number One from the 1930's.

                              Mount Hope Cemetery    100 Cherokee Rd.    Florence, SC 29501    Phone: (843) 662-5145    Fax: (843) 662-5367